Morning Meditation 

🌞Morning Meditation☀️

Humility 

Be not troubled about those who are with you or against you, but take care that God be with you in everything you do. Keep your conscience clear and God will protect you, for the malice of man cannot harm one whom God wishes to help. If you know how to suffer in silence, you will undoubtedly experience God’s help. He knows when and how to deliver you; therefore, place yourself in His hands, for it is a divine prerogative to help men and free them from all distress.

It is often good for us to have others know our faults and rebuke them, for it gives us greater humility. When a man humbles himself because of his faults, he easily placates those about him and readily appeases those who are angry with him.

It is the humble man whom God protects and liberates; it is the humble whom He loves and consoles. To the humble He turns and upon them bestows great grace, that after their humiliation He may raise them up to glory. He reveals His secrets to the humble, and with kind invitation bids them come to Him. Thus, the humble man enjoys peace in the midst of many vexations, because his trust is in God, not in the world. Hence, you must not think that you have made any progress until you look upon yourself as inferior to all others.

~The Imitation of Christ~

St.Bernard on gossiping 


Look at that clever calumniator! He begins by fetching a deep sigh, he affects to be humble, and puts on a modest look, and with a voice choking with sobs tries to gloss over the slander which is on the tip of his tongue. One would fancy that he expressly assumed a calm and easy demeanor; for when he speaks against his brother, it is in a tender and compassionate tone. I am really hurt, says he, to find that our brother has fallen into such a sin; you all know how much I love him, and how often I have tried to correct him. It is not today that I have noticed his failing; for I should always be on my guard to speak of others, but others have spoken of it too. It would be in vain to disguise the fact; it is only too true, and with tears in my eyes I tell it to you. This poor unfortunate brother has talent, but it must be confessed that he is very guilty, and however great may be our friendship for him, it is impossible to excuse him.

~Saint Bernard of Clairvaux from a sermon~

Morning Meditation 

🌞Morning Meditation☀️

Thoughts on Death 


Very soon your life here will end; consider, then, what may be in store for you elsewhere. Today we live; tomorrow we die and are quickly forgotten. Oh, the dullness and hardness of a heart which looks only to the present instead of preparing for that which is to come!

Therefore, in every deed and every thought, act as though you were to die this very day. If you had a good conscience you would not fear death very much. It is better to avoid sin than to fear death. If you are not prepared today, how will you be prepared tomorrow? Tomorrow is an uncertain day; how do you know you will have a tomorrow?

What good is it to live a long life when we amend that life so little? Indeed, a long life does not always benefit us, but on the contrary, frequently adds to our guilt. Would that in this world we had lived well throughout one single day. Many count up the years they have spent in religion but find their lives made little holier. If it is so terrifying to die, it is nevertheless possible that to live longer is more dangerous. Blessed is he who keeps the moment of death ever before his eyes and prepares for it every day.

If you have ever seen a man die, remember that you, too, must go the same way. In the morning consider that you may not live till evening, and when evening comes do not dare to promise yourself the dawn. Be always ready, therefore, and so live that death will never take you unprepared. Many die suddenly and unexpectedly, for in the unexpected hour the Son of God will come. When that last moment arrives you will begin to have a quite different opinion of the life that is now entirely past and you will regret very much that you were so careless and remiss.

How happy and prudent is he who tries now in life to be what he wants to be found in death. Perfect contempt of the world, a lively desire to advance in virtue, a love for discipline, the works of penance, readiness to obey, self-denial, and the endurance of every hardship for the love of Christ, these will give a man great expectations of a happy death.

You can do many good works when in good health; what can you do when you are ill? Few are made better by sickness. Likewise they who undertake many pilgrimages seldom become holy.

Do not put your trust in friends and relatives, and do not put off the care of your soul till later, for men will forget you more quickly than you think. It is better to provide now, in time, and send some good account ahead of you than to rely on the help of others. If you do not care for your own welfare now, who will care when you are gone?

The present is very precious; these are the days of salvation; now is the acceptable time. How sad that you do not spend the time in which you might purchase everlasting life in a better way. The time will come when you will want just one day, just one hour in which to make amends, and do you know whether you will obtain it?

See, then, dearly beloved, the great danger from which you can free yourself and the great fear from which you can be saved, if only you will always be wary and mindful of death. Try to live now in such a manner that at the moment of death you may be glad rather than fearful. Learn to die to the world now, that then you may begin to live with Christ. Learn to spurn all things now, that then you may freely go to Him. Chastise your body in penance now, that then you may have the confidence born of certainty.

Ah, foolish man, why do you plan to live long when you are not sure of living even a day? How many have been deceived and suddenly snatched away! How often have you heard of persons being killed by drownings, by fatal falls from high places, of persons dying at meals, at play, in fires, by the sword, in pestilence, or at the hands of robbers! Death is the end of everyone and the life of man quickly passes away like a shadow.

Who will remember you when you are dead? Who will pray for you? Do now, beloved, what you can, because you do not know when you will die, nor what your fate will be after death. Gather for yourself the riches of immortality while you have time. Think of nothing but your salvation. Care only for the things of God. Make friends for yourself now by honoring the saints of God, by imitating their actions, so that when you depart this life they may receive you into everlasting dwellings.

Keep yourself as a stranger here on earth, a pilgrim whom its affairs do not concern at all. Keep your heart free and raise it up to God, for you have not here a lasting home. To Him direct your daily prayers, your sighs and tears, that your soul may merit after death to pass in happiness to the Lord.

~The Imitation of Christ~

Twelve Rules to Living a Eucharistic Life ~St.Peter Julian Eymard 

First Rule

In the morning, when you wake, go in spirit to the foot of the Tabernacle where during the night, Jesus remained out of love for each one of us.

Make an offering of your day to this gentle Savior, ask him to bless you, to preserve you from all sin and to give you his love.

Second Rule

When beginning your morning prayer, place yourself in spirit before the Tabernacle.

Ask Jesus who is there praying for you, to present your petitions to God the Father, and under his gaze tell, him of your plans for the day, asking him to bless them.


Third Rule

If at all possible, attend Mass every morning. The days when this is impossible choose a moment — preferably after morning prayers — to be present in spirit at the Holy Sacrifice. Go in spirit before the Tabernacle and place yourself in the Heart of Jesus.

Unite yourself to the Masses which are being offered up at that moment — since there is not a minute of the day or night that the Holy Sacrifice is not being offered in some part of the world — and offer Jesus to the Heavenly Father, as a Victim, begging him to pardon in his name, all sinners, particularly yourself, and ask him to enkindle his love in all hearts to increase the number of Saints.

Fourth Rule

Never begin any work or occupation of any kind, never perform any action, nor go out mornings, afternoons or evenings, without having first gone in thought to the Tabernacle, to ask Jesus for his blessings.

Fifth Rule

Before and after your midday and evening meals, withdraw for a moment and kneel down. At least never omit to go at these times in thought, to greet Jesus, whose presence is so much forgotten by so many of our Catholic people. Recall to your mind the thoughts, which have come to you at his feet.

Sixth Rule

Send a loving thought towards the Tabernacle several times a day — for example, when the clock strikes. Tell him how much you wish to love him, ask him to help you, and say the “O Sacrament,” etc. or “Blessed be Jesus in the Most Holy Sacrament of the Altar.”


Seventh Rule

Form the habit of a daily visit to the Most Blessed Sacrament even if it should have to be when you are on your way to work, so that at the hour of death, Jesus will in his turn visit you. If time permits, profit by this visit to put in practice the directions of Rule Nine.

If it should happen that you cannot make your usual visit to the Blessed Sacrament, make a spiritual visit before retiring and remain a few minutes in Adoration thinking of him who is in the Tabernacle only because of his great love for you.

Eighth Rule

When you begin your night prayers, place yourself (as in the morning) in spirit before the Tabernacle. Ask Jesus to help you pray; and then under his gaze, humbly examine your conscience. Think that it is Jesus himself who recalls to your memory what you have done during the day.

Ninth Rule

The Most Important Of All

1. Go and place yourself at least in spirit, before the Tabernacle under the gaze of Jesus.

2. Read over one of the questions, which you will find following this Rule.

3. Pause and reflect for a moment, and think of what your answer will be.

4. Then looking with the eyes of your soul at Jesus who knows your thoughts, say to him:

“Lord, make me understand, make me see, speak to my soul. Speak Lord and thy servant shall hear.”

Ask the God of the Eucharist to speak to your mind and heart, even as he did to those who came to him when he was on earth, and be careful to keep in your mind the question that formed the subject of your meditation, asking Jesus to fill and penetrate your soul with it.

Tenth Rule

If during the day, some trial or trouble should come to you, go at once in spirit to the Tabernacle and confide it to Jesus. In contradictions speak to him at once, asking him to make you patient. If you should happen to be alone, go in spirit to keep him company. He is so often, abandoned by us, in his Tabernacle. Your own isolation will then seem to you less painful. If you are suffering go and rest your tired head on his Heart, and tell him your trials.

Eleventh Rule

In your thoughts, accustom yourself to stay as constantly as possible under the gaze of Jesus — under this grace, this all-powerful virtue, which comes from the Tabernacle.

Show him your soul, and with you the souls of all dear to you. As the Jews of old brought their sick to him to be healed, so will you go to him, being content to offer him from time to time the following fervent supplication:

“Lord, you know my desires, Lord, heal my soul! Lord, make me see! Lord, make me love you”

Twelfth Rule

Work without ceasing to realize in your thoughts the Real Presence of Jesus in the Most Blessed Sacrament.

Give him your first thought, your first glance when you enter the church. Let him be the center of all that takes place there, prayers or ceremonies, sermons or instructions.

Let all your prayers pass through his lips for he is present in the Sacred Host. Place in his Heart all your good thoughts and wishes. Learn to adore him in his Eucharist that you may know how to adore him in Heaven. Perform all your pious exercises under his gaze, for he is watching you from the Tabernacle. Under his gaze receive the Sacrament of Penance. Have but one desire, to approach the Holy Table daily and strive with all your might to realize your desire. May the Eucharistic God become daily more and more your best Confidant and your most intimate Friend. Pray, work and live in him, by him, with him, in order to live with him for all eternity.

St.Peter Julian Eymard~Apostle of the Holy Eucharist 


Feast Day: August 2

Canonized: December 9, 1962

Beatified: July 12, 1925

Venerated: June 22, 1922

Peter Julian Eymard was born on February 4, 1811 in La Mure, France. He grew up in a poor family in Europe after the French Revolution, a time when Catholicism was not looked upon kindly.

There is a story about Peter from when he was only about five years old. His sister was caring for him and he disappeared. She was frightened and began to search the whole town, looking for the little boy. She finally looked into the village church, where she saw that her brother had pulled a small ladder over to the tabernacle and had his ear up against its door. When she scolded him and asked what he was doing, the child told her, “I can hear Him better this way.”

Before his first communion at the age of 12, the young boy wrote a small book of prayers. The prayer to be recited after communion was written as follows:

My dear Jesus,

I thank you for the grace

which you have given me

that you have come to dwell in my heart. 

It was clear from an early age that Peter wanted to be a priest, although his father was not happy with that idea. After he entered the seminary, illness forced him to leave. But he persisted and was finally ordained for the Diocese of Grenoble when he was 23. A few years later he heard some Marist Priests preach. The Marist order is dedicated to Mary, the Blessed Mother. Their message appealed to Father Eymard, and he eventually joined their congregation. He traveled through Europe, giving retreats and missions.

As time passed, he felt very drawn to Jesus through the Eucharist and decided that there needed to be priests who urged devision to this. In 1856, Father Eymard founded the Congregation of the Blessed Sacrament. The men who joined the congregation guarded the Blessed Sacrament 24 hours a day and soon attracted lay persons to do the same. This practice of prayer and devotion before the Blessed Sacrament became known as Eucharistic devotion.

The congregation struggled and was very poor. But Father Eymard did not give up. Despite continuing problems with his health, he even helped form the Sister Servants of the Blessed Sacrament with one of the women who came to him for direction, Marguerite Guillot. Along with the men and women of these congregations he visited the poor and those in prison and tried to Catholics in the teachings of the faith.

In 1868, at the age of 57, Father Eymard died. He was canonized 1962 by Pope John XXIII. He has been referred to as “the Apostle of the Eucharist.”  

50 Maxims for Attaining Perfection by St.Alphonsus Liguori


50 Maxims for Attaining Perfection by St.Alphonsus Liguori 

1. To desire ardently to increase in the love of Jesus Christ.

2. Often to make acts of love towards Jesus Christ. Immediately on waking, and before going to sleep, to make an act of love, seeking always to unite your own will to the will of Jesus Christ.

3. Often to meditate on his Passion.

4. Always to ask Jesus Christ for his love.

5. To communicate often, and many times in the day to make spiritual Communions.

6. Often to visit the Most Holy Sacrament.

7. Every morning to receive from the hands of Jesus Christ himself your own cross.

8. To desire Paradise and death, in order to be able to love Jesus Christ perfectly and for all eternity.

9. Often to speak of the love of Jesus Christ.

10. To accept contradictions for the sake of Jesus Christ.

11. To rejoice in the happiness of God.

12. To do that which is most pleasing to Jesus Christ, and not to refuse him anything that is agreeable to him.

13. To desire and to endeavour that all should love Jesus Christ.

14. To pray always for sinners and for the souls in purgatory.

15. To drive from your heart every affection that does not belong to Jesus Christ.

16. Always to have recourse to the most holy Mary, that she may obtain for us the love of Jesus Christ.

17. To honour Mary in order to please Jesus Christ.

18. To seek to please Jesus Christ in all your actions,

19. To offer yourself to Jesus Christ to suffer any pain for his love.

20 To be always determined to die rather than commit a wilful venial sin.

27. To suffer crosses patiently, saying, ‘Thus it pleases Jesus Christ.

22. To renounce your own pleasures for the love of Jesus Christ.

23. To pray as much as possible.

24. To practice all the mortifications that obedience permits.

25. To do all your spiritual exercises as if it were for the last time.

26. To persevere in good works in the time of aridity.

27. Not to do nor yet to leave undone anything through human respect.

28. Not to complain in sickness.

29. To love solitude, to be able to converse alone with Jesus Christ.

30. To drive away melancholy [i.e. gloom].

37. Often to recommend yourself to those persons who love Jesus Christ.

32. In temptation, to have recourse to Jesus crucified, and to Mary in her sorrows.

33. To trust entirely in the Passion of Jesus Christ.

34. After committing a fault, not to be discouraged, but to repent and resolve to amend.

35. To do good to those who do evil.

36. To speak well of all, and to excuse the intention when you cannot defend the action.

37. To help your neighbour as much as you can.

38. Neither to say nor to do anything that might vex him. And if you have been wanting in charity, to ask his pardon and speak kindly to him.

39. Always to speak with mildness and in a low tone.

40. To offer to Jesus Christ all the contempt and persecution that you meet with.

41. To look upon [religious] Superiors as the representatives of Jesus Christ.

42. To obey without answering and without repugnance, and not to seek your own satisfaction in anything.

43. To like the lowest employment.

44. To like the poorest things.

45. Not to speak either good or evil of yourself.

46. To humble yourself even towards inferiors.

47. Not to excuse yourself when you are reproved.

48. Not to defend yourself when found fault with.

49. To be silent when you are disquieted [i.e. upset].

50. Always to renew your determination of becoming a saint, saying, ‘My Jesus, I desire to be all Yours, and You must be all mine.